Where all are welcome and healing happens

Wellspring Renewal Center offers counseling and therapy for people with mood disorders, anxiety, PTSD, family and marital conflicts, school and relationship problems, issues related to addictive behaviors and more.
OUR PHILOSOPHY

Our Therapists

Our therapists come from a wide range of backgrounds and have a broad set of skills. Together, we provide an inclusive environment that makes our clients and visitors feel safe and open.

Michelle Ainsworth, LPC

I have worked in this profession for over 10 years and it continues to truly excite me when I get to witness my clients begin to recognize their potential and take charge of their lives, possibly for the very first time.  That’s why I have such passion for what I do.

Sean Oakley, LCSW

I have experience working with adults and adolescents experiencing anxiety, depression, and other issues. I believe very strongly in working collaboratively with you and treating you as the expert on your life.
I am especially passionate about working with people who identify as LGBTQ.

Leah Payne, LPE-I, LPC

As a married mother of two, Leah is passionate about working with other women, mothers, individuals, teens, and families struggling to be at peace with themselves, relationships, or general life stresses.
Leah is dually licensed as an Independent Licensed Psychological Examiner (LPE-I) and a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC).

Rebecca Spooner, LPC, NCC

Rebecca pastored congregations for more than 13 years and has been licensed as a therapist since 2007. Beginning in 2006, she worked with Vera Lloyd Presbyterian Home & Family Services to establish the Laurence Schmidt Center (LSC) – the first counseling center in the state specifically for clergy.
She is especially passionate about working with clergy.

Michelle Whitfield, LCSW


Michelle believes that utilizing evidence-based treatments and maintaining best-practice standards are paramount when serving clients. Michelle is also open to clients who choose to include spirituality as a large focus of their therapeutic journey.Michelle has over a decade of experience working with children and adolescents on the autism spectrum. Her primary focus is on children and families but is certified to work with adults, couples, children, and families.

Our Services

We are mental health advocates for our clients, our community, our state, and ultimately, our world. We believe that healing happens when the whole body is nurtured - body, mind, and spirit. We specialize in these areas:

Latest From the Blog

LGBTQ, Religion, and Spirituality

Sean Oakley, LCSW
Many people think that LGBTQ identities and religion don’t mix but this is very far from the truth! Sure, many dogmatic religions can cause significant trauma to LGBTQ individuals with non-welcoming beliefs. However, there are many safe spiritual spaces for LGBTQ people.

Let’s talk about INTIMACY…

Leah Payne, LPE-I, LPC
Okay, so now that I have your attention, I’d like to talk about relationships. Specifically, I’d like to speak to the mothers who are reading this, but these ideas apply to all the amazing fathers reading as well as anyone in a relationship regardless of if you have kids or not.

7 Tips to Improve Your Relationship with Yourself

Michelle Ainsworth, LPC
Hi! I'm Michelle Ainsworth a therapist here at Wellspring Renewal Center. I want to share with you some tips on how to improve your relationship with yourself. Whether it's self-sabotaging behaviors or self defeating cycles we might find ourselves in, SO many of us have been right there; including myself, at times in my life.

Anger in Men

Sean Oakley, LCSW
Everyone gets angry. Humans feel the full spectrum of emotions and anger is one part of this. Anger is a signal that something is not quite matching up to your expectations. It can also come from feeling threatened and feeling hurt. Men, or people identifying with a masculine identify, feel all emotions but often only feel comfortable expressing anger. This is for a variety of reasons. First, boys are often taught to “be tough” or “just deal with it” when they express emotion other than anger. This conditions them to associate any other emotion with weakness. Anger is also a “surface level emotion” meaning that anger is often expressed first when we feel other emotions like sadness. Men may not want to fully process the underlying emotions so anger is fueled and expressed. Our society in general associated emotionality with femininity and men can be afraid to appear “feminine” by discussing emotions.

Ready to take the step toward better mental health?

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Send us a Message

Wellspring Renewal Center
101 North Woodrow
Little Rock, AR, 72205
501-265-0046
501-265-0057 (fax)